A Birth Control Pill You Take Just Once a Month? – Drugs.com MedNews

A Birth Control Pill You Take Just Once a Month? - Drugs.com MedNews

, because it does not depend on daily usage,” said senior researcher Dr. Giovanni Traverso, from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Brigham and Womens Hospital in Boston.
Now, females in wealthier countries have a number of contraception alternatives besides the pill– consisting of reversible, long-acting ones. The scientists will continue to study the safety of the technique in animals, Traverso said. The scientists are working on ways to set off the gadget arms to snap off– via modifications in pH or temperature level.
A study published last month in Science Advances reported on early work into a patch that might provide birth control for a month or more.

A Birth Control Pill You Take Just Once a Month?WEDNESDAY, Dec. 4, 2019– Scientists have actually established a method that might eventually permit ladies to take birth control pills simply once a month.
In laboratory experiments, the researchers found that their small drug-delivery gadget– consisted of within a gelatin-coated capsule– worked as hoped: In pigs, it stayed in the stomach, slowly releasing the birth control hormone levonorgestrel for approximately one month.
Much work remains before its ready for human use. But the objective, the scientists stated, is to offer women a contraceptive pill option that is much easier to take– and possibly be more efficient.
Conventional birth control tablets need to be taken daily, which can be difficult. Surveys have revealed that nearly half of females on “the tablet” missed at least one dosage in the previous three months, or took their tablets at the wrong time.
Imperfect usage suggests the pill does not always work. On average, the approach is 91% efficient at preventing pregnancy, according to Planned Parenthood.
” Certainly one of the theoretical advantages of this drug-delivery system is that it could take full advantage of the efficacy of [contraceptive pill], because it doesnt depend on daily usage,” said senior researcher Dr. Giovanni Traverso, from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Brigham and Womens Hospital in Boston.
That has yet to be revealed. However Lyndra Therapeutics, a company founded by Traverso and others, just recently got a $13 million grant from the Gates Foundation to advance the advancement of the approach and move it into human research studies.
The current findings were released online Dec. 4 in Science Translational Medicine.
Right now, women in wealthier nations have a number of contraception alternatives besides the tablet– including reversible, long-acting ones. Those approaches– intrauterine devices (IUDs) and contraceptive implants– are extremely reliable at avoiding pregnancy. But they have actually to be placed by a healthcare professional, which can be a barrier.
A once-monthly tablet might be particularly useful in establishing countries, where healthcare resources are limited, according to Traverso.
It would be “quickly utilized, self-controlled and low-profile,” he said.
Even in countries like the United States, Traverso said, a long-acting pill might appeal to numerous women who want an oral form of birth control that is more hassle-free.
A professional not associated with the research study stressed the value of choice.
” What we understand for sure is that birth control isnt one-size-fits-all,” stated Dr. Gillian Dean, senior medical director of Planned Parenthood Federation of America.
” Its crucial that we continue to perform research study on brand-new approaches that will broaden the series of options offered, so that people can pick what works best for their lifestyle and body,” Dean said.
The current research study develops on previous work by the MIT researchers, looking at ways to deliver day-to-day medications– including those for HIV and malaria– on a month-to-month basis.
The focal point is a tiny star-shaped gadget that is placed in a gelatin-coated capsule so it can be swallowed. As soon as in the stomach, the pill liquifies to expose the device, whose “arms” broaden so that its too big to enter the small intestinal tract.
It stays in the stomach– “drifting easily,” Traverso stated– and slowly releases levonorgestrel in time. In tests with pigs, the device launched fairly constant levels of the hormone for up to four weeks. In contrast, levonorgestrel offered by standard tablets only lasted a day.
The scientists will continue to study the security of the method in animals, Traverso stated. In order to translate it to human beings, the gadget will be created to break down after 3 to 4 weeks, then be expelled through the digestive tract. The scientists are working on methods to set off the device arms to snap off– via modifications in pH or temperature level.
Researchers are dealing with other ways to expand femaless birth control options.
A study published last month in Science Advances reported on early work into a patch that might provide contraception for a month or more. The patch is pushed versus the skin for a minute, leaving behind an array of “micro-needles” under the skin that contain levonorgestrel. The needles biodegrade in time, gradually launching the contraceptive into the blood.
More details
Planned Parenthood has more on contraception approaches. © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.This material was initially published here.

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